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A quick tip for saving water and money...

Just a quick tip for saving water...

I know its been a while since I last posted... I've been incredibly busy with my latest Green Reno. I'll post pics soon of the progress.

I wanted to pass on a tip I learned recently. I've been doing a lot of research on plumbing fixtures that help us conserve water. And it's funny...the greener the toilet...the more expensive it is. It's actually kind of frustrating

So here's a way to make your own water conserving toilet... open the tank of your normal 1.6 G flush toilet. Fill a 2 liter soda bottle with water and place it in the tank. Voila...you now have reduced your water usage from 1.6G per flush to 1.0G per flush. You may have to adjust how much water you have in the 2 liter to get your flush right. But this is alot cheaper than spending $600 for a new water conserving toilet.

This is just another example of how it doesn't take money to save money...

Mike Hogan

Associate Broker

RE/MAX Commonwealth

(804)503-0811

RVARealtor1@gmail.com

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Comment balloon 6 commentsMike Hogan • March 06 2009 08:52PM

Comments

Hi Mike--I had just heard about that one too.  Makes sense.  My latest green build was required to have low flush... I think I may go back to remodels....

Posted by Tamara Perlman (Referral Network Inc.) over 8 years ago

It does make sense...I havent tried it yet. I installed dual flush Totos in my house. But I certainly like the idea. All of my remodels have dual flush...I think its a better option both from a performance and marketing standpoint.

Posted by Mike Hogan, MBA (The Hogan Group at Keller Williams Realty) over 8 years ago

A regular toilet is not designed to flush paper and solid waste with reduced amounts of water, so the likelihood of clogging or having to flush twice after installing a water displacement device increases. Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the diameter of the trap way has to be a small as possible (please view siphon vs. washdown technology here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_z6pymOet7g&feature=channel_page.) If you are serious about saving water, want a toilet that really works and is affordable, I would highly recommend a Caroma Dual Flush toilet. Caroma toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. Caroma, an Australian company set the standard by giving the world its first successful two button dual flush system in the nineteen eighties and has since perfected the technology. Also, with a full 3.5" trap way, these toilets virtually never clog. All of Caroma's toilets are on the list of WaterSense labeled HET's http://www.epa.gov/watersense/pp/find_het.htm and also qualify for several rebate programs currently available throughout the US as well as LEED points. Please go to http://www.caromausa.com for more detailed information or visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/howto.asp to see how we flush a potato with the half flush (0.8 gallons), meant for liquid waste. To learn more about toilets you can also visit my blog http://pottygirl.wordpress.com/. Best regards, Andrea Paulinelli

Posted by Andrea Paulinelli over 8 years ago

Andrea- I totally agree that going with a water saving toilet is the way to go for those who can afford it. I personally installed the Toto dual flush in my house and absolutely love the performance. But there are many among us who want to conserve water and be a little "greener" but simply cant afford the $400-500 price tag of a modern dual flush toilet. Thanks for reading and for your response...

Posted by Mike Hogan, MBA (The Hogan Group at Keller Williams Realty) over 8 years ago

I have a five gallon flusher and live off of a well and live in the Southwest. I know this trick very well. But what you might not know is that your bottle might float off sometimes and actually block the flapper from going back down and cause the toilet to run and run and waste and waste.

Fill the bottle with some pebbles or select an object that won't become buoyant.

I recently sold a home with a composting toilet. Now, that was a real water saver if you don't mind something a little more organic shall we say.

Posted by Sabrina Kelley, Woodland Park Colorado Mountain Homes and Land (ERA Herman Group Real Estate) over 8 years ago

Mike-good post, I did the same thing by adding a brick.

Best,

Adrian

Posted by Adrian Willanger, Profit from my two decades of experience (206 909-7536 AdrianWillanger-broker.com) almost 7 years ago

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